2019 ​Ironman Chattanooga Race Report

September 29, 2019

It was so hot outside…

How hot was it?

It was so hot that the loaf of bread I bought at the store was toast when I got home.

It was so hot that I started my clothes on fire just to cool off.

It was so hot that I saw a heatwave but I was too hot to wave back.

It was so hot that hot water was coming out of both sides of the faucet (in my hotel that was true!).

It was so hot that I jumped in the Tennessee River just to get wet, got on my bike and rode 116 miles just to have some wind blow on me, and then dumped ice down my pants for 5-plus hours as I ran through the streets of Chattanooga just because that’s the kind of weird things an Ironman triathlete does when faced with one of the hottest days I have ever raced in.

 

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I am an Ironman Chattanooga finisher.  A 2019 Ironman Chattanooga finisher.  I don’t say that lightly.  The race day high temperature reached 94 degrees from what I can see on the internet.  Humid too, pushing the real feel heat index up over 100 degrees.  Mostly sunny.  No wind.  No escape from the heat.  It was hot.  Chattanooga threw a heck of a day at me, and I am proud to say I was able to get the job done.  Here’s a recap of how I survived this day and was able to become a four-time Ironman.

 

TRAINING

Once again, I followed Don Fink’s book Be Iron Fit to train for this race.  It has served me well the past three races, and again I followed the 30 Week Competitive Plan to get ready.  I did make some changes to the plan, mainly to the swim.  The school I normally use for swimming changed their policy regarding daytime public access to the pool, so I decided to wait until I opened my own pool to swim, which meant I missed several weeks of swim training.  And like I did when I trained for Ironman Louisville, I decided that the plan had too much swimming for my needs.  So I reduced it to two 45-minute swims per week, and if I couldn’t get those two swims in, I shot for one 1-hour swim on my Monday rest day.  Seeing that Chattanooga would be a current aided swim in the Tennessee River, I figured I would be okay.

Biking and running were done mostly to the plan and all went well.  Once again I felt that Be Iron Fit prepared me well.  My teammates Dave, Alex, Jeff and his sister Jan all followed the plan and we had a great time training together (mostly virtually) over the summer.

 

RACE WEEKEND

My wife Kari and I left for Chattanooga Thursday morning and drove the 9 or so hours with a few stops along the way.  After checking into the hotel and grabbing a bite to eat, we waited up for Alex, Dave and his crew to arrive.  Jeff and Jan were late arrivals and we met up in the morning.

 

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Kari and I were trying not to melt in the Ironman Village.

 

We all met up had breakfast and then went to the Ironman Village to check-in.  We attended the “mandatory” athlete briefing, and then it was back to the hotel to escape the heat for a while.  We even opted to eat the pasta buffet that the hotel hosted on Friday just because it was an easy option and we didn’t have to go back outside.

Saturday we checked our bikes and dropped off our gear bags and then the group decided to drive the bike course to see what we were up against.  We always make this mistake because experiencing the course from a car is nothing like experiencing the course from the bike and it usually scares the heck out of us.  But Dave mentioned that since none of us came out and said anything really noteworthy about it, it must not be that bad.  I agreed, it didn’t really seem that bad, just a bunch of hills repeated over and over again with some good downhills thrown in.  It didn’t shock us like Wisconsin, Lake Placid, or Louisville did thankfully.

 

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L to R – myself, Dave, Jan, Jeff, and Alex – Team Gunners!

 

We later sat in the hot sun and attended the Welcoming Ceremony hosted by the Ironman announcer who does a pretty good Mike Reilly impersonation.  I didn’t catch his name but he was fine.  The video about what it’s like to sign up and train for an Ironman was pretty funny and got us in a good mood for tomorrow.

One thing I dropped the ball on with this race was that it was the host for the Ironman North American Club Championships.  I regret that we didn’t register our team and compete against the other clubs and teams.  I bet we could have beaten some of them, especially with our ringer, Alex gaining huge points for us.

 

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Our Gunner bikes are racked and heading to the bag drop off areas.

 

After a dinner with the gang and our families, we headed back to the hotel and made plans to meet at 4:50am to head to transition.  Ugh.

 

RACE DAY

I slept pretty decent and got up feeling pretty good at 4am.  After getting ready and downing a bagel, I grabbed my Morning Clothes bag and headed to the lobby.  The Gunners all seemed awake and ready to take on the day.  We walked to transition to check our bikes and bags and to get body marked.

 

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She wrote my “tri” age as big as she could on my calf so the old fogeys in my age group could read it without their reading glasses.  I asked for my usual smiley face and she was glad to do that for me.  That got her my red wristband that we were supposed to give out to volunteers that make a difference in your day.  It certainly made hers.

 

 

I gave the tires the old finger pinch test and decided that they felt pumped up enough to not bother trying to find a pump to use.  If anything they might be a little low, but with the heat, they would probably gain a little pressure throughout the midday ride.

 

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Kari catching me in a relaxed mood prior to heading to the swim start.

 

 

We hopped on the school bus for the shuttle ride to the swim start and I took a seat with Dave, just like we did back in kindergarten 50 years ago.  The bus dropped us off in the dark and we got our bearings and took a seat on the grass to await the start.

Dave and I opted to start in the 1:10 to 1:20 pace group, which turned out to be pretty appropriate for me.  Alex started up in the first wave, and Jeff and Jan started in a few behind us.  I pulled on my Roka swim skin and got my earplugs, goggles and swim cap on and that is when Kari and Ben found us.  After a quick picture, it was time to start moving to the start.

 

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Mr. Six Pack abs next to me was probably wondering why we weren’t starting in the old fogey wave.  I looked up his results, he only beat me by 1 hour and 16 minutes.

 

We shuffled our way down the path to the dock, avoiding pee puddles along the way and jumped in.  I wouldn’t see Dave again until the second loop of the run.

 

SWIM – 2.4 Miles / 1:16:14 / 57th M55-59 Age Group / 645th Male / 898th Overall

I realized as soon as I hit the water that the swim, the portion of triathlon that I usually dread, was going to be the easiest and most enjoyable part of the day.  The water was warm, clean and wet, just like I like it.  I reminded myself to start slow, start heading wide and just swim nice and easy.  The kayakers and stand-up paddleboard volunteers monitoring the swimmers seemed to prefer everyone to stay on the left side of the buoys.  I did that for the first two, but then moved over a little and kept the majority of the rest of them on my left because I wanted to be as far out in the river as I could to take advantage of a stronger current but I’m not sure it made much of a difference.

I had heard in the athlete briefing that when the buoys turn from yellow to orange you were halfway done.  The last buoy was marked with a number 9 and I told myself to count off nine more.  When I saw the last red turn buoy I relaxed rather than start sprinting to the swim out like I normally do.  I was helped up the stairs by volunteers and gave a glance at my watch and saw 1:16.  I was hoping to be closer to one hour but I think the lack of a wetsuit kept me from hitting that.  My two 45-minute weekly training swims were plenty to get me ready for that swim.

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Exiting the swim and hitting the lap button

 

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Off to the bike!

 

Overall, it was a low-contact, uneventful swim that I kind of wanted to enjoy a little longer because I knew 116 miles of riding a bike in 90-degree temps was about to begin.

 

T1 – 10:39

I found my bag quickly and was off to the change tent.  I rubbed a ton of Body Glide on my feet, grabbed my stuff, ate most of a Clif Bar and a gel, and took time to spray myself down with sunscreen before heading outside and having more sunscreen put on me by volunteers.  I grabbed my bike off the rack and headed out.

 

BIKE – 116 Miles / 6:47:00 / 40th M55-59 Age Group / 505th Male / 641st Overall

After driving the course the day before, I knew the road was going to be rough, so I made sure I paid attention to the road.  I found myself trying to hold back my pace but I was feeling super good.  I was doing 20+ mph easily and that’s not how to start out on the day that was ahead of me.  I finally decided to watch the speed and heart rate a little more and just relax.  I found a good pace and settled in.

At the first aid station, I decided to refill my water bottle with GU Roctane drink mix that I had trained with all summer, but I ended up spilling most of it because the volunteer helping me put in too much water in my bottle.  It made for sticky arm pads and aerobars, but I took another water bottle and washed it off.  No harm, no foul.  I needed to use the bathroom, so I handed my bike to a kid volunteer and went inside for a quick potty break.  I pulled my tri shorts down and that’s when my first OH NO! happened.  I had dealt with some saddle sores on my butt from training and I had remembered that I had this little 1/4 inch thick foam rubber pad that I started using to provide much-needed relief.  I decided to put it in my shorts before leaving transition and it was doing its job.  But as I dropped trou, the pad fell into the blue lagoon.  For one hot second, I thought about reaching in and grabbing it!  But I quickly came to my senses and just dealt with the fact that my butt is going to be sore for another six hours.

 

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Early in the first loop.  I still had the original water bottle that I had started with.  I have no recollection of that building behind me.

 

 

The bike course consisted of one little rolling hill after another and they just wouldn’t stop coming.  But when you ride a course like that it kind of engages you and focuses your attention on shifting and adjusting to the effort, which keeps your mind off the heat or in my case, my sore butt.  I always find it interesting that in a race with 2000 or so triathletes, you tend to end up in a group and stick with them the majority of the ride.  It makes sense because sooner or later you are going to settle in with people riding at the same pace.  I had some good conversations with a few of them.  Most of the conversation was started because they liked the saying I had put on the back of our team tri suits:  “I HATE THIS SPORT”.  The other Gunners said they also got plenty of feedback from that saying.  Alex made that saying our motto, and we always joke about it.

 

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I’m pretty sure there were some mountains around me but you don’t really notice much, which is a shame.  You can see I was in the middle of the road to avoid some orange painted road hazard on the right just behind me.

 

 

 

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I think this photo was taken just after the one above.  I remember two different photographers not too far apart from each other.  This is on Hog Jowl Road after turning around and heading back north.  It had a nice descent here.

 

 

As for keeping up with my hydration and nutrition, I think I did pretty well.  I stopped at nearly every aid station and got a fresh water bottle and Gatorade Endurance bottle, even if they weren’t completely empty.  I grabbed some cut banana pieces occasionally and kept taking my gels every half hour.  I did stick with a salt capsule every hour through the first half of the ride, but I added an additional capsule every other hour on the second half.  I didn’t want to get low on electrolytes, but with the Gatorade, gels, and salt capsules, I think I was plenty fine on electrolytes.

 

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Just about to wrap up the first loop of the course and spied Kari, Ben and the gang in Chickamauga, Georgia.

 

 

I had one little incident with a bug flying into the slot at the top of my helmet which forced me to pull over and try to get it out of there because I didn’t want it to sting me.  Otherwise, the ride was pleasant enough in spite of the heat.  Truthfully, the heat never fully came to the forefront of my focus on the bike.  Creating my own breeze at 18 mph, dumping water on myself, and focusing on not wrecking on one of the bad sections of the road was enough to keep my mind off the heat.  My Garmin data shows that I averaged about 18.1 mph, but that doesn’t take into account the amount of time that I spent stopped at the aid stations. Garmin tells me that I had about 23 minutes of non-moving time, so you can see that I did spend some time in the aid stations.  It also shows that I maxed out at one point at 37 mph, so there were some good downhills.  The one difficult climb was the last part of the south section of the course on Cove Road, which was a very slow spin for a few minutes, but we were then rewarded with a quick downhill just before the hairpin turn onto Hog Jowl Road and heading back north.

I can remember thinking that this was the most difficult bike course of the four Ironman courses I have ridden, but after a few days of thinking about it, I don’t think it was as bad as I was experiencing during the ride.  Don’t get me wrong though, I’m pretty sure that I don’t want to experience that course again.

 

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Finally wrapping up my trip through Northern Georgia and pulling into Chattanooga and transition.

 

 

T2 – 12:08

I grabbed a water bottle off my bike and made my way to the Run Gear bags.   I sat down in the tent near the exit where the fan was blowing and emptied my bag on the ground.  First up was to grab the wet towel I had stored in a bag and wash my face off.  It was hot, but just getting sweat and grime off of me makes me feel better.  Next, my socks came off and I saw that my feet looked a little pale and water-soaked but weren’t sore at all.  I grabbed the Skin Glide lotion and emptied it on both feet and then pulled on fresh socks.  I had put my fuel belt in my bag with a bottle containing energy drink, but after it sat outside in the sun all day I didn’t think I wanted to drink that.  Plus it was heavy and I decided that just running with the bib belt was my best option.  I opted for a running hat instead of a visor to keep the sun off my bald head and to have the possibility of putting ice in it if I needed to.  My gel flask with my GU in it and an empty plastic bag to fill with ice on the course went into my back pockets and off I went to get some more sunscreen before heading out of transition.

 

RUN – 26.2 Miles / 5:11:48 / 24th M55-59 Age Group / 380th Male / 486th Overall

 

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I managed to start running somehow.  Kari grabbed this shot of me and said she thought that I looked a little better than Dave and Alex did.  Not sure I was buying that.  Kari captured some excellent pictures of me and the Gunners.

 

 

I may have managed to start out jogging, but when the course started to head out of Downtown Chattanooga it became an uphill grind in the sun for about 6 miles.  My body was telling me that I wasn’t going to last very long if I tried running up the hills and in the sun.  I walked.  I walked some more.  I stopped at every aid station and took on ice and cold drinks.  I went to the water bottle I was carrying a lot, but only kept it about a third full so it wouldn’t be too heavy to carry.  Refilling it wasn’t a problem.  Miles 1-6 was a slog and I just was hoping to get from aid station to aid station.  I grabbed some ice water-filled sponges and stuck them under my kit, redipping them at a few of the aid stations.  I kept up the routine of walk and jog, and at the aid stations I followed the same routine nearly every time:  eat some GU, drink the ice water, dump the ice into my tri suit somewhere, get some flat cola with ice and drink it, get three to four potato chips or pretzels and try to wash them down with some more water, fill my little plastic bag with ice and stick it in my pocket, then move to the next aid station and repeat.

 

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First loop and glad to see Ben and Kari out on the course.

 

 

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Not long after seeing Ben and Kari, I made my way across this bridge over the river and to North Chattanooga where the real challenge of the race waited.

 

 

Once over the Tennessee River, I got to meet a street called Barton.  Barton sucked.  I foolishly thought that once I walked up it that it would level off and that portion of the loop would be flat.  Wrong.  It went downhill even longer, then the loop portion had hills.  So I walked when it went up, jogged when I went down and made my way around a nice part of Chattanooga.  Lots of local crowd support out and about providing music and cheers for everyone.

 

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Making my way back over the river to finish up the first half of the run and start the second loop.

 

 

As I returned back to the other side of the run course to begin the second half, a strange and unexpected feeling started to come over me.  I was actually starting to feel strong and felt pretty good.  The sun was starting to set and I told myself that I would prefer to get out and start heading back through the trail portion of the course before it got dark.  I started picking up the pace, still stopping at the aid stations, but no longer lingering there.  I was actually passing people.  Actually, no one passed me while I was running that I can remember except for Jeff, but he did that much earlier.

Somewhere around Mile 18, I passed Dave.  This was a moment that I had been chasing for four Ironman races now.  Dave had beat his brother John, Jeff and me at all of our previous races and I really wanted to savor this moment.  But I couldn’t.  He was having a tough time.  I almost made the decision to just run the rest of the race with him, but now I was no longer last, and Jeff wasn’t far ahead.  So Dave and I chatted a little bit and gave each other some encouragement, and I began the task of chasing down Jeff.

Jeff started the race after Dave and me, so I knew I had a headstart on him, but how much of a headstart I didn’t really know.  I figured about five minutes or so, but in reality, it was more like 20 minutes.  I didn’t know it, but there weren’t really enough miles left in the race to make that up unless he walked and I kept up my now great pace.

Around Mile 23.5 I saw him ahead of me in the pitch dark.  I thought maybe I could sneak past him like I tried to do in Louisville, but at that point, it was really just him and me on that road section.  I caught him and gave him an emphatic “GUNNERS!”  and we ran together and chatted until the next aid station, where we both walked and got our fluids and fuel and stopped at the port-o-potty.  Barton was ahead of us and Jeff said he was walking it.  I ran up it.  I ran up it and felt great.  I ran down it and felt great.  I decided that I could skip that last aid station and motor on back in.  Then Jeff passed me back.  DAMMIT!  We had a mile or so to go, but he ran out of gas and I passed him back.  I tried to get him to run with me, but I think he was being nice and let me finish ahead of him.  He knew that he had a better overall time and was in no way going to lose it in the final stretch.  But I put down the hammer anyway, shifted into high gear and practically sprinted my way into the finisher chute, extremely glad to be done with this race.

One last note:  Ironman Chattanooga run course was without a doubt the toughest marathon I have ever run.  Hands down.

 

 

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Hitting the carpet…

 

 

 

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Emotion is starting to hit me…

 

 

 

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Chris Hedges – YOU ARE AN IRONMAN!

 

 

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GUNNERS

All five of us were able to beat the heat at Ironman Chattanooga.  I’m so proud of my teammates and what we were able to accomplish.

ALEX – 12:44:30

 

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Alex is the real deal.  He had a great swim and bike but had to dig deep to get through the run.  He hates this sport.

 

 

JEFF – 13:25:11

 

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Impressive finish for Gunner Jeff.  He was in Brussels this week and still race hard.  I think his running streak of at least 30 minutes per day is paying off for him.  He had an awesome run.

 

 

DAVE – 13:58:23

 

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Dave had a rough day by his standards, but still impressive as always.

 

 

JAN – 15:51:22

 

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Jan joined us Gunners for this race and finished her second Ironman well before the cutoff.  An outstanding performance.

 

 

Some Non-Gunners!

 

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Susan and John are some local friends from the running club that I may or may not have influenced them to do this stupid race.  I think they had doubts about finishing, but they did.  And they will never doubt themselves again.  Ironman finishers in their first attempts.  Impressive.

 

 

 

A couple others of note from the running club:  Charlie trained his ass off and I marveled at his bike rides he would post throughout the summer.  Unfortunately, Charlie came down with a stomach bug the day before the race and was in no shape to attempt the race on a super hot day.  He was at the finish line and he told me what was going on and I felt awful for him.  But he’s a prior experienced Ironman finisher and I hear he’s got another race coming up soon.  And Charlie’s training partner Casey is also from the running club and took on Chattanooga for her first and crushed it in a little over 12 hours.  That is impressive to do on such a hard course and a super hot day.  Very impressive.

 

 

THANKS

Many thanks to go around.  First, as always, I’m super appreciative to have such a loving and supportive wife who encourages me and puts up with my crazy adventures.  I can’t imagine doing these Ironmans without your love and help.  These finishes are powered by your love. Thank you, Kari.

To my son Ben, who took time off from work to fly to Chattanooga and chase us guys around in 95-degree temps, thank you very much.  You make me proud.

To my Gunner teammates Alex, Dave, Jeff, and Jan!  Truly a pleasure sharing this lifelong memory with you.

Carla once again came through for us on the lodging and cheering.  It’s an incredible relief to not have to worry about hotels and the stuff you arrange for us.  Thank you, thank you, thank you.

To Maxwell and Zachary, thanks for being good sons to your dad and providing some entertainment and distraction from the nervousness of the Ironman circus.  Maxwell is a champion cheerer on the run course.  Always has been.  And many thanks to Kennedy for watching those two goofs and cheering us on.

Jill, you are one of the most cheerful people out there.  Thanks for providing us with that lift every race.

To my coworkers who put up with my whining about training and bragging about Ironman.  Hey, that’s what an Ironman does.  Suffer for 140.6 miles, brag for a lifetime.  A special thanks to Julie, who in spite of dealing with a flooded basement, still found the time to track me and watch me finish live online.  Even sent me a screenshot.  Thank you!

And thanks once again to my super fan Carl, who greets me every day with “GOOD MORNING IRONMAN!”  You take a sincere interest in my pursuit of this dumb sport, and I truly appreciate it.  I tried my best to spell out CARL in a “YMCA” fashion at the finish line.  I hope that you caught that.  It’s not easy to do after 144.6 miles in God awful heat.

 

 

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Until next time.  I hate this sport.  Ironman.

 

 

I’m Not Freaking Out, You Are!

IRONMAN CHATTANOOGA 2019 TRAINING

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WEEK 29 – Monday 9/16/2019 – Sunday 9/22/2019

One week until race day!  And it’s getting a little crazy in my world.  Even after going through this three times now, I still get anxious and nervous and slightly bonkers knowing what is coming up.  I basically go to sleep thinking about Ironman, and it’s the first thing on my mind when I wake up.  It does consume my thoughts, that is for sure.  But the majority of the things that can worry me are the things that are in my control.  It’s the out of control stuff that people really freak out about.  Here are some examples of things I freak out about, both in my control and out of it.

Last week I noticed that my bike was no longer shifting from the big ring to the small ring on the crank.  This could be a big problem for me as I spend a lot of my time spinning in the small ring, especially up hills. I decided to give my bike a good cleaning and see if I could find what was causing it not to shift.  I figured it was probably junked up with sweat/Gatorade/road debris, etc., but the cable is not allowing it to move the chain.  This will probably require a new cable, which also means a trip to the bike shop.  I took the bike into the shop and was told I would get it back in a couple of days.  Just as I thought, the cable was frayed inside the housing and they replaced it, and also performed a tune-up on the rest of the components.  That freak out was definitely one I could deal with, although having to deal with it so close to race day was not comforting.

When I got the bike back I brought it home and decided to adjust the seat a little, and that is when I noticed the clamp that holds the saddle to the seat post was cracked!  Yikes!  Can you imagine having that break during the race and having to ride standing up for 116 miles?  OMG.  I took off the part and headed back to the bike shop and thankfully they had another one, and it only cost me $6.40.

 

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The piece that keeps my saddle attached to the bike.  Yeah, kinda important.

 

The other thing that is freaking us all out is the weather, and this is something none of us can control.  Most weather apps are predicting the weather in Chattanooga on race day to be 96 degrees with 53% humidity, meaning a possible real feel temperature of about 105 degrees.  100% sunshine and very little wind the last time I checked it.  I can’t control that, but I can prepare for it.  I plan on taking extra electrolytes with me on the bike and run, and to hydrate like crazy leading up to Sunday and during the race.  I added some extra sunscreen to my bike special needs bag just in case and will make sure to not leave transition without having a volunteer lather me up with the stuff.  I also plan on really keeping a close eye on how I feel and making sure that I don’t overdo the bike.  Being smart on the bike sets you up for a good run, and that’s my plan.

With the heat being what it is, I am sure that the swim will not be wetsuit legal.  I can easily get through a quick sprint triathlon without the wetsuit, but an Ironman swim is a heck of a lot longer.  Fortunately, at Chattanooga, the swim is current aided, and I am pretty confident that I can swim the course easily without it.  I practiced using a swim skin, a type of swimsuit you wear over your tri suit that reduces water friction I guess, but it was very tight and was rubbing my neck quite a bit.  Not sure I want to chafe my neck and then sweat on that sore spot for 13 more hours in the race.

I always let Carla handle the hotels for us and she has never let us down.  Thankfully that is one thing I am not freaking out about.  Carla is the best!

Saturday was the worst for me and got to thinking too much about what is going on, not just with the race but with family and everything else.  Fortunately, Sunday came and I got in a good run and realized that this sport is just about doing three things in one day. All of which is heavily supported with volunteers and people stand around cheering you on.  I’m going to have a blast in Chattanooga.

Then Dave hit us with this:

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Now I’m freaking out again!

 

WEEK 29 TRAINING TOTALS:

Swims: 2 total, 4200 total yards

Rides: 3 total, 65 total miles

Runs: 5 total, 22 total miles

Note:  I will wrap up Week 30 when I write my race report.  

 

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THANK YOU TAPER!  ON TO RACE WEEK!

 

 

 

 

 

Not Fun Anymore

IRONMAN CHATTANOOGA 2019 TRAINING

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WEEK 28 – Monday 9/9/2019 – Sunday 9/15/2019

I was having a great week, I really was.  Then Sunday came along and I’m not sure that I am wanting to do this anymore.

I’m going to cut to the point.  I pissed off an asshole driver for the simple reason of riding my bike.  Not once, but twice – by the same fucking driver 3.5-hours apart.  It seems that this driver doesn’t want to share the road with a cyclist, which was me.  Pulled up behind me both times, blasted her fucking horn and then passed by so close that I could touch her damn Nissan Juke.  The second time she pulled in front of me and slammed on her brakes.  Nice.  Whatever the fuck she needed to do – what could it be?  Go to the grocery store? Go get gas? whatever – it was more important to her than my fucking life.  I have some video of her doing this, but not of the slam on the brakes part because my camera battery on the front of my bike had died.  Oh well.

 

You can see in the video that I’m blocking a little because there are a curb and a median right after crossing the tracks and if I even hint that there might be enough room to pass me, my experience is that they will try to do it.  She must have been really pissed to have to deal with my old ass not once, but twice.

I could quit riding roads and stick to the trails, but guess what?  That’s even worse.  The people on the trail are ten times riskier than car drivers and no one polices the trail.

Most of the time I feel pretty safe, but it only takes one time, one instance to make me question doing this at all.

I will take the video to the local police tomorrow and show them, but it probably won’t do any good.  I’m guessing they probably hate old dumb ass guys on bikes too.

 

WEEK 28 TRAINING TOTALS:

Swims: 1 total, 2800 total yards

Rides: 3 total, 100 total miles

Runs: 5 total, 32 total miles

 

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There’s no future in dying according to my buddy Carl.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lincoln-Way Foundation Half Marathon Race Report

When:  Saturday, September 14, 2019 – 7 am

Where:  Frankfort, Illinois

Distance:  Half Marathon 13.1 Miles

Results: Official time 1:38:35 / 12th Overall / 1st Place 55-59 Male Age Group

Results Link:  Click here for the race results

 

 

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Guess which button I pushed.

 

I do dumb things.  Not all the time, but when it comes to running I can make some terrible choices.  This week I decided to race a local half-marathon, two weeks away from Ironman Chattanooga.  Typically this would be a time to reduce mileage and intensity and coast into the “A” race feeling good and raring to go.  My Ironman plan called for a 2-hour run for Sunday, and even though I had already decided that racing would be a bad idea, I went ahead and signed up for it anyway.  This race benefits the local high school foundation and so I didn’t mind contributing to that cause.  I figured that I would push comfortably hard, and if I sensed that I was overdoing it or possibly straining myself too much, I would dial it back and coast it home.  Ha!  On with the race!

I woke up to an absolutely beautiful day, temps in the mid-50’s with low humidity and hardly any noticeable wind.  Perfect running day.  I met up with my son Ben and did some pre-race chatting with him and then got ready.

 

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Ben leading the pack out of the start gate. Nice picture, Kari!

 

The first three miles of this race are basically flat, and I felt awesome.  I was floating along and at the 3-mile mark, I noticed my watch had a 22-minute split, which I felt would have been a pretty good 5K time!  It wasn’t long until we hit the hills of the nature preserve.

The course is on my typical training route so I knew what to expect.  I planned to take it easy up the hills and take advantage of the downhills.  My first mistake was taking a gel right around the 4-mile mark, which was the beginning of one of the big climbs.  I struggled to breathe as I was trying to swallow that junk.  A little of it seemed to lodge in the back of my throat which caused me some irritation that lasted the duration of the race.  It wasn’t killing me, but it certainly was annoying.

It was also about this time that I realized that I was once again the caboose of the front pack of racers.  All the speedsters were ahead of me and I was bringing up the rear.  Not a soul behind me that I could see.  So I focused on keeping up with the group of three runners right ahead of me and tried to keep a steady pace.

Around mile seven I started to catch the group of three that had been ahead of me, but they then started to pull away.  It was still way too early for me to start any sort of kick, so I just tried to keep them in sight.  Around 9.5-miles into it I caught one of them and started working on the rest.  By mile ten I found myself pacing behind another runner wearing an Ironman visor and I ran with him to see how he was feeling.  I had just taken my last of three gels and the energy was starting to come back.  I said to him lets get that guy ahead of us but he couldn’t go with me, so I started reeling in Mr. Pink Shoes.  As I was working on that guy I could hear what I thought was the Ironman visor guy catching up with me, but when he passed me it was another guy that had caught me and was pulling ahead.  I told him to “go get it” and he put some space on me.  As we came to the big hill going over Route 45, I pulled him back in and we both passed Mr. Pink Shoes guy.  I used the downhill after cresting the bridge to kick hard with about a half-mile or so to go and it seemed neither of those two guys had any kick left.  I crossed the finish pretty much with no one in front of me and no one right behind me.  I’ll take that.

So, did the decision to race this close to an Ironman kill me?  No.  It was still not in my best interest to run it, but I’m glad I trusted my instincts and ran the race.  Racing may not be the main reason I run, but it’s up there.

 

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Ben and I post-race and post-breakfast.

 

 

 

The Dreaded Week 27 – Part 4

IRONMAN CHATTANOOGA 2019 TRAINING

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WEEK 27 – Monday 9/2/2019 – Sunday 9/8/2019

The Dreaded Week 27 is over!  And two days ahead of schedule.  I have followed this training plan four times, and I should know by now that yes it is hard, but I always get it done, and it’s usually no big deal.  It’s just that after the previous 26 weeks of training, I get to the point that I have had enough.  But it’s done, and it’s time now to start pulling back and coasting into the race on September 29th.

I’m not sure how I keep track of anything going on in my non-triathlon training life right now, but I’m writing this wrap-up on Sunday evening as usual and I don’t even remember much about this week.  Life here in our household is insanely crazy, and it’s not going to get any easier until late October!

The Dreaded Week 27 is dreaded because it is the longest and most difficult of the 30 weeks of training in my Ironman training plan.  The weekend workout calls for a six-hour ride with an hour-long run right afterward on Saturday, and then it’s followed by a three-hour-long run on Sunday.  But guess what?  I had to move them to Thursday and Friday because I needed to go to my lake home and get my boat out of the water and do some winterizing of the boat and house.  There are literally no free weekends to take care of that responsibility until after Halloween, so it had to be done.  It was kind of a blessing actually because I didn’t have two extra days to fret about doing that long ride and long run.

The weather turned cool and the 20-mile run went pretty well.  The plan just wants you to get in three hours of running, but I decided that I would shoot for 20 miles regardless of the time it takes me.  Fortunately, I felt pretty good and got out and back on my route in 2:53.

I took the day off from work on Friday and hit the road by 7 am.  It was another cloudy day but not as cool as Thursday was.  I was a little worried that my legs would be a little tired trying to ride 100 miles after running 20 miles the day before, but they felt fine.  It was my butt that didn’t like it.

 

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Taking a break at 2.5 hours into the six-hour ride to refill my water bottles and give my butt a rest.  Does it look like I’m dreading the rest of the ride?

 

My butt hates me.  I’m not sure if I am capable of making it happy.  I have been training as much as I can in the tri suit that I bought for this event, and even though it is comfortable enough, I’m not sure the chamois pad is working for me.  I’ve tried creams, lotions, band-aids, silicon type spray, etc. and nothing seems to make the miles less strenuous on my sit bones.  That’s the real issue.  You can’t really distribute the weight around on a tiny tri bike seat.  Most of the contact is made in a small spot and the constant pressure and movement of my legs end up causing the discomfort.  It’s not that I can’t ride 100 miles or the 116 miles of Ironman Chattanooga this way, it’s just not going to be enjoyable.

Anyway, the bike ended just at 100 miles and just a couple minutes below 6 hours.  I had to really give myself a strong pep talk to change shoes and go for an hour-long run, but once I started out the door it was over after 6 miles.  Nice and easy run at a pace I described as “I don’t want to do this run” pace.

 

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Proof that I am crazy.

 

I tried to relax after that and wait until Kari came home.  She’s been swamped at work and our planned trip north to Minocqua didn’t get started until 7 pm.  We decided to drive up to Madison and stay the night.  That was a good move.  We got there Saturday morning and got so busy that training and my butt didn’t even come into my mind.  I think being up there also improved Kari’s mood too.  That’s what lake life can do for you.

 

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One last boat ride before pulling it out of the water for the season.

The Dreaded Week 27 is over.  The boat is out of the water and winterized.  Nothing more to dread until race day.

 

WEEK 27 TRAINING TOTALS:

Swims: 1 total, 2800 total yards

Rides: 2 total, 119 total miles

Runs: 4 total, 37 total miles

The totals are a little less than last week but I lost two days of training when I moved Saturday/Sunday to Thursday/Friday.

 

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I went by Madison, Wisconsin today and didn’t even have time to stop and watch Ironman Moo!

 

 

 

 

Do You Want A Nutty Bar?

IRONMAN CHATTANOOGA 2019 TRAINING

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WEEK 26 – Monday 8/26/2019 – Sunday 9/1/2019

Dave came to join me for the Saturday long ride, a planned 5.5-hour ride with an hour-long brick run right after.  As he was getting ready I saw that he was doing a little pre-ride carb-loading with what looked like a Little Debbie Nutty Bar.

“Is that a Nutty Bar?” I asked.  “Yeah, do you want one?”

Do I want one?  That’s like offering a junkie a fix.  That’s like asking a dog if he wants a bone.  That’s like asking a fisherman if he wants to go fishing.  That’s like asking…  well, you get the point.  At one time I was addicted to the dang things.  I would buy a box weekly and have one for my mid-afternoon snack.  When I go on car trips and stop for gas, the snack I look for is a Nutty Bar or a Payday if the gas station is dumb enough to not stock Nutty Bars.

So back to the question – did I want one?  You bet I did.  But seeing that I had just eaten breakfast and also was dealing with a pre-ride nervous stomach, I didn’t want to chance eating one and regret my decision.  So I very reluctantly took a pass.

 

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Little Debbie and her Nutty Bars sponsor Ironman Chattanooga.

 

So onward we rode heading south and west on the route I take because it’s the safest and best riding from where I live, but that can be an issue if the wind is not in your favor.  We could tell that the wind was going to be in our faces coming back as we rode out with ease.  But as we turned around, it didn’t seem to be too much of a struggle.

 

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Dave complying with my mandatory selfie.

 

 

At the turn around we filled up our water bottles and Dave texted his brother John that we would swing by his house to pick him up.  John had done Wisconsin and Lake Placid with us, but his growing little family has now taken priority in his life.  So we were looking forward to riding with him.

We finally got to his place and I could see he was having some issues with his bike.  He showed us his chain and it looked like he had tied the chain in two knots.  Quite a head-scratcher for sure, but we got it sorted out and hit the trail for home.  When we got to downtown Frankfort, this younger guy on a mountain bike asked as we passed if he could join us.  I don’t think any of us said yes to him, but he grabbed on to us as we were trying to meander our way back through Frankfort that was extremely busy with the annual Labor Day Fall Fest.  Dave and John both rode up and told me that this guy was behind us, so I pushed the pace and tried some different routes to see if we could drop him or get him to get bored with us, but he hung on.  We finally got close to my house and stopped and told the guy the ride was over.  I guess that was all it took and he said he’d ride around Mokena for awhile.  I got to hand it to him, he kept up with us at times doing 25 mph or so on a mountain bike.

 

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John opted out of the run, so we snapped another mandatory selfie before Dave and I started the run.

 

The run went well and we both came back ready to be done with the day.  I offered Dave the opportunity to jump in the pool for a cool down, but he declined.  He loaded up his gear in the car and we said our goodbyes.  As I walked away, he said: “Hey, do you want a Nutty Bar?”  I reluctantly declined again, this time with a chuckle.  I didn’t think a Nutty Bar sitting in a warm car would be very tasty, and I kind of wanted some real food so once again I reluctantly passed.

They better have Nutty Bars at the finish line of Ironman Chattanooga.

 

WEEK 26 TRAINING TOTALS:

Swims: 1 total, 2800 total yards

Rides: 3 total, 131 total miles

Runs: 5 total, 45 total miles

 

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The Dreaded Week 27 is looming…

 

I Got the Moods

IRONMAN CHATTANOOGA 2019 TRAINING

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WEEK 25 – Monday 8/19/2019 – Sunday 8/25/2019

Granted, I’m a pretty moody SOB to begin with, but this week I was in a funk.  After training for four Ironman events, I should know by now that come about this time during training that I can get moody.  Week 25 in my thirty-week training plan is usually when I am sick of the training and just want to get it over with.  I’m not alone in that, plenty of triathletes get that way judging from the posts I read on Facebook this week.

It started last week really when I had sort of a rough Saturday long ride and run workout.  It wasn’t bad, but I felt like it wore me out more than it should have and that I should have my hydration and nutrition better dialed in by now.

Then on Wednesday, I realized it was the 40th anniversary of my father’s passing.  I spent some time reflecting on that for some reason.  Truthfully, I don’t really remember mourning his passing when I was 15 years old and usually, the day passes by without me even noticing.  But I did remember this week and got reflective about it.

The following day I had a work event in the evening that I wasn’t really excited about doing.  The event was just not my thing, but I went and realized that I was silly to feel the way I did.  My coworkers appreciated my effort even though I was in a mood, and I realized the people there were fighting things in life that I had no idea about.  I’ve written about attitude before and reminded myself about being more understanding and appreciative of others and their personal battles.

But on Friday I had a good day.  The weather got cool – temps in the ’70s for late August made for a great 1.5-hour run.  Saturday was also beautiful.  My 5.5-hour bike ride was awesome.  I dialed back the effort a little and found that I didn’t wear myself out as much as I usually do.  I think if I plan to ride about 17mph in the race it will be a good tempo to leave me feeling good for the marathon.  I never felt dehydrated or without energy, and the hour-long run afterward went great.  Sunday was another great weather day and the 16.5 miles of my 2.5-hour run seemed to float by.

 

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Why didn’t I just ride an extra mile or so and make it a perfect 100-mile day?!  

 

 

The weather certainly made a huge difference in my attitude.  I am really hoping this trend continues to race day.  A great day will make for a much better mood for me.  Five more weeks of training and I am now kind of looking forward to it.

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I took a little time to refuel at the turnaround and realize that I am lucky to do this dumb sport.

 

WEEK 25 TRAINING TOTALS:

Swims: 1 total, 2800 total yards

Rides: 3 total, 140 total miles

Runs: 5 total, 43 total miles

 

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On to Week 26!