​2019 Chicago Marathon Race Report

2019 Chicago Marathon

October 13, 2019 / Chicago, Illinois

Time:  3:34:46

Place:  8487th Place Overall / 6610th Male / 243rd Male 55-59 Age Group

 

Another Chicago Marathon is in the books!  Here’s a “By-the-Numbers” look at my race.

– Number of Chicago Marathons I have started and completed.

21 – Total number of marathons run (including Ironman finishes).

3 – Where my finish ranks for the fastest marathon finish times for me (3:25 in 2016 & 3:28 in 2015, all at Chicago and all in my fifties.).

3 – Number of times meeting the Boston Marathon qualifying standard, all at Chicago.

13 – Seconds below the BQ at this race (3:35:00 is the BQ for my current age/sex).

0.000000000001 – Percent chance that I will get into the Boston Marathon with that slim margin.

0.0 – Percent chance that I will even apply for the Boston Marathon with that time.

2 – Number of weeks after completing Ironman Chattanooga that I ran this race.

97 – Minutes faster I finished the Chicago Marathon compared to the marathon split at Ironman Chattanooga (5:11).

27.1 – Miles that my Garmin watch recorded for the run.  It was off by 2/3’s of a mile by the halfway point.  It’s hard to plan splits when your watch gets off.

8:12 – Average pace minutes per mile (I was aiming for 8 min/mile).

7:13 – Best mile split, Mile 1

 

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Feeling good back downtown in the first half of the race.

 

8:56 – Worst mile split, Mile 26

3 – The number of seconds Emily’s grandfather yelled at me that I was wasting by stopping to kiss Kari when I saw her and the group of family and friends that came to watch Emily and I (okay maybe just Emily) race.  I wasn’t expecting to see Kari that early in the morning because she had a long night on Saturday.  So I took 3 seconds to appreciate that.  Worth it.  Should have spent four seconds.

1:45:00 – Halfway (13.1 miles) split, a perfect 3:30 pace split (Nailed it!).

 

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Just crossed the 13.1 Mile mark timing mat at exactly 1:45:00.

 

– Number of times I stopped for a bathroom break.

1 – Number of times I peed into an empty Gatorade bottle shoved discreetly down my pants in the start corral before the start.

4 – Number of guys who stood next to me in the corral and whizzed openly on the curb.

41 – Degrees Fahrenheit at the start of the race.

45786 – Number of finishers.

187 – Average run cadence/steps per minute for me.

156 – Average heart rate/beats per minute for me.  Seems high.  I wasn’t working that hard.

2919 – Number of calories burned, according to my Garmin.

51331 – Number of steps total for the day.

6 – Mile where you turn back south and get a whiff of the strong smell of breakfast being served at some restaurant along the course.  It makes me angry every time because I want to stop and eat pancakes and can’t.

1 – Number of times I said to myself during the race that I am not enjoying this anymore, somewhere around Mile 8.  Yeah, I know, pretty early on and it was due to the cold wind that was blowing on me all of a sudden.  The wind was pretty strong and cold at times.

2/3 – Portion of the race that I kept my gloves on for.

Numerous – Number of spectators I saw trying to cross the gauntlet of runners to get to the other side of the street, which is really a dumb idea and really ticks me off.

1 – Number of spectators I saw wipe out trying to cross the gauntlet of runners to get to the other side of the street, landing with a pretty hefty thud, which caused me to laugh and call him a dumbass.

2 – The number of Ben’s friends (Adam and Colin) still hanging out around Mile 22 that I saw and High-5’d.  It was a welcome boost.

4’9″ – The estimated height of the girl that I spent the majority of the race running with, usually behind her because she had such an arm swing going that I was afraid she would punch me with it.  It’s interesting that after a couple of miles into the race that you will be running with the same people for the majority of the rest of it.

3:25 – The finish time I was predicting for myself at the halfway point.

3:30 – The finish time I was predicting for myself at the 20 Mile mark.

3:35 – The finish time I was praying for with one mile to go so that I would be under the time cutoff for a Boston Qualifier.

 

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The finish line was dead ahead.

 

– Number of hills of any significance on this course – located at Roosevelt Road, AKA Mt. Roosevelt, which comes at Mile 26.  It’s a nothing hill but comes at the end and I started to cramp up and had to walk some of it.

0 – Desire to do this race again.

 

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Exhausted, glad to be done.  But the journey wasn’t over just yet…

 

 

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Okay, that’s enough of the numbers.  Here is the report in a nutshell.  The race went pretty well for me.  I was a little concerned that I would not have been recovered enough after finishing Ironman Chattanooga two weeks prior to running this race.  But seeing that Chattanooga was so hot and that I walked/jogged the vast majority of it, the Ironman didn’t really beat me up that much.  I actually felt pretty good after it.  So I decided to push myself in Chicago and shoot for a 3:30.

I had one layer too many on at the start and the windbreaker that was getting me too warm and making me sweat was handed off to Kari in the early miles.  The temperature was awesome, but the occasional gust of wind would jolt you pretty strongly.  I was taking on water and Gatorade as well as hitting the gels every 30 minutes, which I increased in the latter part of the race.  I felt that my energy level was good, but my muscles were just not responding and getting more tired and sore as the miles added up.

 

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Kari knows how to spectate this course.  She was able to catch me as I shuffled through the last mile toward the finish.

 

 

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I wouldn’t say that I hit a wall, but I did feel like the last 5K was a battle of will for me.  I really dug deep in that last mile and a half.  I could see that my pace was slowing even though I felt like I was giving it everything I could.  It seemed like I was passing a lot of people at the end, but that’s not unusual.  Then I finished and was relieved.

Now the fun part starts.

After crossing the finish I tried to keep moving forward.  My hands started to tingle and I could feel myself starting to get a little lightheaded.  I grabbed a water bottle and started drinking it.  A medal was placed around my neck by some bearded guy and I worked my way through the chute.  One thing about the marathon finish chute is that there isn’t any place to sit down.  That’s by design, they don’t want you to stop moving or it will clog up everything for the remaining runners coming in, and it is in your best interest to keep moving so you don’t start cramping.

It wasn’t long and a girl ahead of me dropped to the ground and started screaming in pain, raising her leg up.  Clearly, she was having a bad leg cramp, but the volunteers didn’t have a clue what to do with her.  As I stepped around her I assured myself that they would help her, and I did that because I didn’t want to BE her.  My goal was to make it to the Medical tent and be close to it if things went further south for me.  As I got there I was met by two guys, Jeff and Kyle, a couple of nice guys, probably med students, who started peppering me with questions.  I thought I was passing their test, but they decided to get me in the tent and get some blankets on me.   A doctor approached and peppered me with more questions, one of which was “what’s your bib number?”  Hell, I couldn’t remember it.  I don’t think I ever really committed it to memory.  It had an 11 and some 6’s and 7’s.  “Okay, let’s go sit down.”

They sat me on the cot in what I could tell was a pretty empty medical tent and made me lay down, and that’s when all hell broke loose.  My calves seized up and I began screaming.  Loudly.  Then they had a great idea to shove a foam roller under my legs and have two massage therapists grab my calves like they were squishing Play-doh between their fingers.  That prompted more screaming now fortified with some very strong expletives.  They were fighting me and I was fighting back.  I finally convinced them that I needed to stand up, which thankfully for them they allowed, because had they not I would have summoned all strength that I had to murder each and every one of them.

Guess what?  The cramps went away as soon as I was on my feet for a few seconds.  I apologized, they understood and we tried a different approach.  I was now shivering and blankets were piled on me.  After a little walking, I sat in a chair and they brought this thing over called a “bear hugger,” which was a warming blanket that was heated to 43 degrees Celcius.  They offered warm chicken broth and Gatorade and I did my best to get that in me.  It was now pretty clear, I was dehydrated and paying for it.  But at least I was now warm and toasty.

In retrospect, an IV probably would have done me wonders but I was reluctant to ask for one.  I had gotten them post-race before years ago with no issues, but one time at the Rockford Marathon I requested one and the next thing I knew I was in an ambulance taking a trip to the hospital.  I did not want that to happen, so I kept my mouth shut.  Also, getting an IV would have required me to lay down again and there was no way in HELL I was going to do that.

After warming up and doing some more walking around, they allowed me to leave.  Actually, I think it was more along the lines of they no longer needed to waste their time with me.  I asked where the Red Gear Check tent was and they offered to get me a golf cart to take me there.  Really?  After I called each and every one of you an MFer, you are going to cart me there?  Sweet!  So I hopped in “GOLF CART 1” as the lady driver broadcast herself into her portable radio, informing maybe the other two people listening that she was giving me a lift.  The ride was to the Red Gear Check tent was interesting.  Instead of putting me in a wheelchair and pushing me there in a couple of minutes, we instead drove what seemed like 90 MPH down the sidewalk along Lake Shore Drive for several minutes, while Helen Wheels kept blowing a whistle to get people to get out of her way.  I was crouched over trying not to get tossed out of the cart while still clutching the three blankets around me to keep me warm.  We passed the backside of the Red Gear Check tent at what seemed full speed and I really wished that I had just walked there instead, and then we pulled into an open gate while other workers looked at us like this was quite unusual.  She drove me as close to the Red Gear Check tent as she could without hitting other marathon finishers walking past.  I could read their faces – “How the hell did this guy get carted to the Red Gear Check tent?!  Must be a celebrity or VIP or something.”  Hardly, just some guy who just had experienced the strangest 60-minutes post-marathon of his life.  Then Helen Wheels barked into her microphone “GOLF CART ONE RETURNING TO THE MEDICAL TENT,” and that was the last I saw of her.

But wait, there’s more.

So I get my checked bag from the Red Gear Check tent and was so glad that I had checked a hoodie and some pants.  The warmth felt great after a 90 MPH ride in a golf cart with Helen Wheels on a now 48-degree day.

Then it hit me, I had to walk back to the hotel.  Not sure that it was even a full mile, but at the pace I was shuffling at it was going to take me a while.  Where the heck was Helen Wheels when I needed her?  I spotted some port-o-potties and peed for the first time since 7:15am, then I shuffled over and saw the Runner Reunite area, and since the big inflatable labeled G-H was nearby I made my way close enough to see if I could see Ben or Kari standing there.  That was never in the meet-up plan, so I wasn’t surprised that I didn’t see them.  Exiting Jackson Street back onto Michigan Avenue was miserable.  Tons of people all trying to squeeze out right there and now I was getting a little too warm.  Thankfully I made it to Michigan Avenue, turned north and that’s when I saw my tall son towering over the rest of the pedestrians.  He looked relieved to find me.  As we shuffled down Adams Street I apologized for my slow tempo, and I could tell things weren’t right.  I was getting nauseated.  When we got to Dearborn Street I spied a large planter next to the road and basically barfed up all of the liquid that I had just put in me in the Medical tent.  I instantly felt better.

Kari was walking to meet us and was briefed and we went back to the hotel where I showered up, put on some clean, warm and comfortable clothes, and then started walking to the car.  On the way, we offered a homeless person one of the blankets I had been given in the Medical tent, and it was gratefully accepted.  As we headed out of downtown Chicago I caught a glimpse of some runners still on the course running in Chinatown at Mile 21.

After some restless attempt at sleeping in the car on the way home, upon getting home I walked inside and said hello to my daughters Ashley and Rebecca and laid down on the bed and slept.  After eating some soup Kari picked up for me and some salty potato chips and sugary drinks I started coming around.

And my friends wonder why I declare after every marathon that I will never do another one.

Now they will wonder why I keep signing up.

Author: Ironman Chris

Family, running, triathlon and drumming are my things.

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